Home Bread-Bakers v097.n004.7

Subject: Re: Yeast: instant vs rapid rise && Measuring butter

bc151@cleveland.Freenet.Edu (Ken Fisler)
Thu, 16 Jan 1997 09:22:46 -0500 (EST)
I noticed myself and was informed by others that a recent posting
of mine was garbled-- actually it should have been two separate
postings.  Due to requests from list members, I'm trying again.

========================== first posting =======================

On Wed, 18 Dec 1996 13:11:45 -0500 "Ellen C." <ellen@elekta.com>

> Jean at Ritterhaus wrote:
> > Isn't the Red Star yeast carried by Sam's the instant kind?
> > That's what we have in the Sam's here.  And that would explain
> > the fact that it cannot be risen as much as regular yeast.
> There seems to be some confusion regarding "instant"  vs. "rapid rise"
> yeast. Based on a lot of reading, and many conflicting counts, here is my
> understanding:
>  [...]
> Can anyone give us the absolute truth on instant yeast?

Here's some info directly quoted from Red Star documentation:



This yeast is sold to the commercial and retail bakers throughout
the United States.  It comes in one pound and five pound cakes and
crumble fifty pound bags.  In order to achive the solid
formulation, the "yeast cream" is pumped into presses where the
excess water is removed.  Once pressed, the resulting "cake" yeast
is transferred to mixers, to assure uniformity, and then to
extruders where the proper lengths and weights are cut.  After the
cakes are wrapped or bagged, they are stored in refrigerated rooms
to await shipment.

Compressed Yeast is also called "wet yeast" or "fresh yeast."  It
is traditionally sold to consumers in two sizes: 2 ounce and 8
ounce blocks.  The yeast is characterized by a high moisture
content (about 70%).  It is perishable and should be stored under
refrigeration at all times.  The shelf life is about 8 weeks from


This yeast is processed one step further than Compressed Yeast.  It
is extruded into noodle form, loaded onto a conveyor belt and
passed through a series of drying chambers where warm air is blown
through the yeast.  The yeast emerges with a moisture content of
about 8% as compared to 70% moisture in Compressed Yeast.  Due to
the low moisture content, the yeast is in a semi-dormant state.
Therefore, it can stand long periods of exposure with little effect
on its ultimate baking activity.  The packages are nitrogen flushed
to extend the shelf life which is about one year from packaging.
This yeast is sold in a 3-pack strip and a 4-ounce jar.

		       QUICK RISE (tm) YEAST

This is a high activity yeast strain created by protoplast fusion,
the scientific technique of combining two separate yeast strains
into a superior single strain.  The manufacturing process is the
same as for Active Dry Yeast, except that ascorbic acid is added as
a dough conditioner or enhancer.  It is also available in nitrogen
flushed 3-strip packages and 4-ounce jars.


The nutritional "yeast cream" is heated by means of a heat
exchanger and held at pasteurization temperatures for a period long
enough to kill the yeast.  During this holding period, the
necessary vitamins are added to meet the requirements of the
specific type of nutritional yeast produced.  The yeast is then
drum dried before it is ground and shipped to consumers.  SEE
NUTRITIONAL YEAST PROCESS CHART [not included].  Nutritional yeast
is marketed for its protein and vitamin content with no leavening
power.  The drying process assures that all the cells are killed in
order for the full nutiritional benefits to be available.  This
yeast is available in both powder or [sic] pill form.


Either Red Star doesn't consider "Instant" as a type of (their)
yeast or for some other reason decided to leave it out of their
documentation.  Sorry.  Hope this helps a little anyway.

========================= second message =======================

Several weeks ago an Australian member of the list asked about
American measures relating to butter.  Here's what I read off a
typical package.

One "stick" of butter is 113 grams (metric system weight).  By
American volume measurement, this same stick of butter is also 8
tablespoons which, in turn, is equivalent to one-half cup.

Here in the U.S. butter is most commonly packaged in a 1 lb. (453
gram) box containing four sticks.


Sorry for any inconvenience my garbled posting might have caused.

Hope you and yours all had very enjoyable holidays.

Best regards,

Ken Fisler